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In fatwa no. 5572, you said that it was permissible for an Islamic group to restrict themselves to a few aspects of Islam, as long as they believed that this was a “stepping stone”.

For example, the Tablighi brothers emphasize on the importance of strengthening ones faith, by the practise of some a’maals. However, these a’maals have been restricted (seemingly), to actions such as prayer, fasting, zikr, hajj, etc. Alhamdilillah, these selected actions are of course important. However, the hadith of Hadhrat Ayesha (RA) states that “enjoining the good and forbidding the evil”, encompasses all aspects of Islam. Thus, instead of limiting ourselves to what we perceive to be “good” and “gradual”, should we not be adhering to what the righteous Sahabi said? If Hadhrat Ayesha (RA) said, that to “enjoin the good and forbid the evil” means to emcompasss everything in Islam, should we not carry out the fardh according to her opinion? By enjoining all the good of Islam, and forbidding all the prohibitions of Allah, by speaking of the Islamic political, social, economic, judicial and as well as the spiritual system, will we not be more accurate in completing the fardh properly? In Islam, every action must have a ruling, and every ruling must have an evidence (daleel). Please provide the evidence to support the “gradual” approach of some groups, that you have endorsed (as being permissible) as opposed to the opinion of Hadhrat Ayesha (RA).

Answer

Surely, it is not generally possible that every individual do everything. It
suffices that individual while doing any good does not negate other good
done by others.

Good encompassing all good is different from practicing on all good.

and Allah Ta’ala Knows Best

Mufti Ebrahim Desai

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This answer was collected from Askimam.org, which is operated under the supervision of Mufti Ebrahim Desai from South Africa.

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